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Survival Myths (Best Of r/AskReddit)

Survival Myths (Best Of r/AskReddit)


What is a survival myth that is completely
wrong and could get you killed? 01
If you ever fall off a ship or ferry at sea and were lucky enough to be spotted, don’t
try to swim your way to safety. The more you try to swim, the lesser the chances
of survival. Just try to keep afloat and conserve energy
and body heat while rescue team do what they’re supposed to. Unless you are in hypothermic waters, the
best bet always is to stay afloat without trying to swim to somewhere. This information about falling overboard,
hypothermia and conditions, survival at sea, etc, are based on my own experience of 12
years sailing on merchant ship. Example. https://youtu.be/gqMuvPVpaM8 02
YouTube videos on how to unarm an attacker from close range. You’ll die before you can yell yeehaw. Yeah. If you have not trained extensively in real
self defense, you should never try to fight an armed opponent. Just give them what they want or run. Those videos usually have the person letting
the moves be put on them very easily. When in reality, a lot of those moves need
to be executed at extremely fast speed with practiced precision. Otherwise you will just end up in a wrestling
match against someone with a knife, which usually won’t end well. 03
If you ever find yourself in snake country, make as much noise as possible. Most people want to avoid snakes so stay quiet,
but they are more scared of you than you are of them. Talk loudly, stomp, but obviously keep an
eye and ear out for any fellas who don’t want you to be there. Yeah. Louisiana swamp person here. Make some noise and most hazards will avoid
you without you even knowing they were there. Hiking in Canada as a kid, I was afraid that
bears would get me. My dad laughed, and said as noisy as I was,
I would probably never see a bear in my life. Except for the Death Adder, which will lie
there and ignore 19 people stepping over it, then bite the 20th one who has the bad luck
to step on it. Easy solution. Just get bit by a Death Subtracter. 04
“Follow flying birds to find water”. They can simply be flying to spend a night
anywhere, so we can’t rely on them. I always heard the opposite. “If you’re lost on the sea, follow birds to
find land”. This one is actually true though. This is true. However, you can usually follow birds to find
land if at sea, as most birds like to nest or rest on land. Good luck though if you try to follow a migrating
bird or a bird who stays at sea for more extended periods of time. Probably best to, if possible, identify the
type of bird first to weigh your options. 05
You do not need to wait 24 hours to report a missing person. If you think someone is missing, report it
as such. The faster a missing person report is filed,
the greater the chance the person will be found. Especially if it’s a child. Missing children are at high risk during the
first 24 hours, especially if abducted. In 76% of child abduction murders, the victim
was dead within 3 hours. 88.5% were dead in the first 24 hours. It’s actually a felony in some states to
fail to report a child missing after a certain amount of time. Edit. Caylee’s Law
The first 48 hours are the most important in missing persons cases too. The 24 hours thing applies mostly to adults
who are unlikely to have been abducted and are more likely to have just gone somewhere. But it all comes down to urgency and vulnerability. For children, you can file if they have been
missing for 20 minutes and police will get on it and search the immediate area. This also applies to people who have learning
difficulties, depression, suicidal tendencies, dementia, etc. Anything that makes them vulnerable. 06
Sucking a snakebite. It will often make it worse. Australian doc here. There is so much misinformation on here! What you want to do is stop the venom from
travelling from the site of the bite into the lymphatic system and then into the bloodstream. DO NOT suck, cut, wash or otherwise investigate
the wound. EDIT. Do not try to catch or kill the snake. Identifying the kind of snake is NOT worth
the risk of a second bite and the delay in getting to your other priorities. Priority 1. Get away from the snake. Priority 2. Get help. Get someone nearby to call an ambulance or,
worst case scenario, call yourself. EDIT. Leaving this here because it’s hilarious. Priority 3. Stay still. Moving your muscles is what helps pump the
fluid through your lymphatic system and to the lymph nodes, where it can enter the bloodstream
quickest. Ideally, keep the bite below your heart, but
immobilisation is the most important thing. Priority 4. If there is someone with you, get them to
apply a pressure dressing to tightly compress the whole limb. This can greatly slow the flow of lymph and
buy you hours. The issue with a tourniquet, as opposed to
full limb compression, is that you’re not actually preventing the spread of lymph up
the limb. Taking the tourniquet off then becomes very
risky for a sudden influx of venom into the central circulation, and has serious risks
of permanent damage and loss to the limb. EDIT. I can only speak for what to do regarding
Australian snakes. Other areas obviously have different species
and perhaps correspondingly different guidelines. If you are doing outdoorsy crap in other continents,
make sure you know basic first aid relevant to that specific location. 07
Removing a bullet is more dangerous than leaving it in. Trying to remove it can tear vital organs,
it can be pushed in even deeper, or removing it can cause the person to bleed out. So digging it out with a rusty knife and covering
it in duct tape doesn’t instantly heal you? Far Cry lied to us! Yep. There is pretty much no reason to ever go
digging around in a gunshot wound in the field with a pair of pliers, trying to get a bullet
out. Your only goal is to control bleeding and,
if possible, prevent infection. And then get to a hospital, because if you
got gut or chest shot, you’re going to die in one of many horrible, slow ways if you
don’t get into surgery. There is one good reason. The dink it makes when it hits the metal tray
after being released from the hemostat. As lame as it sounds – heh, pun – we mostly
use plastic basins now. To avoid possibly losing the bullet, since
it’s legally evidence, it’s not often dropped into the basin, but placed semi-carefully. That’s assuming it’s not just placed on the
mayo stand or in a raytec or something anyway. Really depends on the doctor. But unfortunately, you don’t see many metal
kidney trays in trauma 1. I haven’t anyway. Source: CST. Expanding on this. Knives or sharp objects. If you are ever, ever stabbed, DO NOT REMOVE
THE KNIFE. Call 9 1 1, wrap a cloth very, very gently
around the entry wound, and do not move the knife. There is a significant risk that you will
do more damage pulling it out than when it went in. This goes for glass injuries, debris injuries. You wait until you’re in the ambulance or
ER and you let the professionals do it. If you try to Rambo it out of you, you’re
going to open up every blood vessel that knife is blocking and you’re probably going to bleep
up previously undamaged organs or tissue. This is why cutting weapons aren’t all that
realistic in movies. Stabbing is a FAR more effective means of
killing people, as a large percentage of stab wounds are fatal beyond 2 inches. Gunshots are basically stab wounds with more
velocity and splash damage to the tissues. Digging around for a bullet basically makes
your existing ‘been really stabbed’ problem worse. This is the same for arrow wounds and other
deep punctures. The movie thing about just yanking out an
arrow and proceeding on is just abjectly fictional. 08
Rescue breaths are wildly overrated in most movies and TV shows. You’ll see someone in cardiac arrest, and
the rescuer will stop giving compressions and focus on breathing into a person’s mouth
and BLAMO! Awake, alert, alive! Nope. Don’t do that. Your body does store a fairly decent amount
of oxygen in its blood at all times. If someone in front of you OD’s and their
mouth is covered with saliva or vomit or someone collapses in front of you of a suspected cardiac
arrest, your plan of action is 2 fold. Are they breathing? Do they have a pulse? This is easy to bleep up, especially in a
moment of panic. My rule, as an EMS provider, is that if you
don’t feel it in 10 seconds, it’s not there. Start compressions! If they are not in cardiac arrest, they will
let your bleep know, and the law covers you under good Samaritan clauses in most of these
cases. If you are the only person attending to this
body, do not stop and give rescue breaths if help is on the way and will be there soon. It takes about 4 to 7 decent compressions
to get blood recirculating in the body after stopping to give mouth-to-mouth. That’s a lot of blood, carrying a lot of vital
oxygen reserves, that aren’t making it to the brain. Obviously, if you’re a long way out from help,
and you feel safe to do so, give rescue breaths. But it should NEVER be priority number 1. By the way, if you hear ribs crack, make a
face, make vomit noises if you have to, tell the person their bones are bleep grossing
you out, but don’t stop compressions. Because what are compressions? That’s right. They are number bleep one. 09
The first mistake is to look for food and water first before having a shelter up to
keep yourself dry and warm! Edit. When I say shelter first, it includes having
a fire too, which I forgot to mention. When you are wet and exposed to the elements,
your core body temperature can drop and you can get hypothermia if it gets too cold and
you would burn more calories than necessary. A big reason to building a shelter too is
to also keep yourself off the ground, because the ground is an infinite heat sink, which
means you lose your body heat way faster than you would think and will be more exposed to
the cold and elements. Guys, yes, it’s good to be near a water
source, but remember that it’s always colder around rivers, streams, lakes, and oceans. Make sure you are able to easily gather shelter
and fire material within the area. Plus finding a prime location to set up shelter. Please Remember What’s First
P, protection, shelter. R, rescue. W, water. F, food. Order of priority in a survival situation. Even in a hot location, you are far better
to take shelter from the sun and wait until the cooler part of the day to seek water than
immediately set about looking for water in the heat. Equally, in the cold at night, you want to
keep warm and wait for warmer conditions and daylight to find water. Both sweating through being too hot and increased
respiration through your body being too cold and needing to keep warm will use lots of
water and make you thirsty quicker. Best to conserve the water you already have. I’ve heard of the 3, 3, 3 rule. You can die in 3 hours from exposure (no shelter),
in 3 days from no water, and 3 weeks from no food. Of course, those numbers are subject to vary
from person to person, but the biggest thing to get out of this rule is what should be
your priority when trying to survive. 10
Don’t eat snow to stay hydrated if you’re in a winter survival situation. Losing the heat to the snow while eating it
is more dangerous than dehydration. Heat it up or let it melt in a container first
to lose less heat. If you have fire and a pot, put ice in it,
not snow. It is cleaner and more dense than snow, i.e.
you get more water out of it. Edit. Not sure about the cleanliness of ice vs.
fresh snow. But we are still talking about boiling that
water. And my main argument, that you get more volume
of water from ice than from snow, still stands. Edit 2. It’s only an argument I heard somewhere else,
so this could be one of those survival myths. Everyone who disagrees: Yes, it could be that
I’m totally wrong on this one. Don’t know why it got so many upvotes. 11
If you have to forage for food, avoid mushrooms entirely. Odds are so slim you will find an edible kind
that you’re much better off looking for things like nuts, seeds, and berries. Edit. This is not the myth. This is the truth. “There are old mushroom pickers and brave
mushroom pickers, but there are no old and brave mushroom pickers.” Aren’t a lot of berries pretty poisonous? Probably best to not eat anything and wait
for search and rescue to find you in a day or 2. Exposure and dehydration are definitely the
more immediate problems. Not to mention that some nuts, if not prepared
correctly, and eaten in large quantities, are just as poisonous. Tannins in acorns, for instance, or horse
chestnuts. 12
Closest I can think of is brace yourself if you are about to get in an accident. Try to go limp. You’re more likely to walk away with minor
injuries if you go limp. That’s how drunk drivers survive crashes. Heard a story of a guy who got caught up in
a tornado. Right before the tornado sucked him in, he
got hit in the face with a vase, which knocked him unconscious. The tornado then threw him onto the ground
a couple miles away. He survived with only some minor scratches
and bruises. I feel kind of bad for laughing. He stared death in the vase and survived. 13
One I know of is the myth that you can drink water from a cactus. I heard it’s false and you can only drink
from a small minority of cacti without having certain health consequences I am not aware
of. Give you the bleep, which makes you more dehydrated. It’s the barrel cactus you have to avoid especially. In old westerns, the cowboys used to slice
off the top and drink from it. It’s a nice way to close up your throat from
the extremely high salt content. Some cacti are fine to eat, some are poisonous,
and some contain psychedelic drugs. So you’re saying I could be ok, die, or
trip my balls off? Imma roll that dice. 14
Herbivorous animals are friendly and peaceful, so you are safe being around them and their
presence will show you where food is. Seriously, everything from cows to deer can
and will kill you if you make it angry. It is usually a good idea if you are in the
wild not to get near any large wild animal, but herbivores can often be even more aggressive
than the predators. If a predator attacks you, you have a fairly
good chance of scaring it off, especially if it’s smaller than you, because it’s likely
only looking for food. If a herbivore attacks you, you’re bleep because
it genuinely wants to kill you. 15
You can hydrate from soda. If that’s all you have, drink it. So are you saying it’s a myth or the truth
that you can hydrate from soda? Drink it if you have it and not water. Drink the water first. Alternatively, if you go for long without
food, the caffeine will hurt like crazy for an hour or two but the calories will keep
you going. 16
Too long, didn’t read. If done right, a tourniquet should hurt like
a mother bleep and you’re going to want to loosen it, but in the words of Egon Spengler,
“It would be bad”. Gradually loosening an applied tourniquet
over time is a thing I still see in 1st aid training videos for some reason. Don’t do that. Once a tourniquet is on, remember, and mark
the person if you can, what time it was applied and leave the rest to doctors in a stable
environment. Loosening a tourniquet may result in blood
loss returning, which requires retightening it. Tightening and loosening repeatedly may cause,
on top of additional blood loss, blood to pool up inside the limb, which can cause even
more damage. Edit. It’s going to take over 2 hours for muscle
and nerve damage to start occurring and about 6 until everything is dead and needing an
amputation. Many a folks have said that recent advances
have prolonged that time. I can’t find a source to validate that, but
it seems believable – would like one if anybody has one – as tourniquet use has heavily increased
in the military and civilian world the past 15 years thanks to the CAT, so I’m guessing
surgeons have worked with them more. This much more recent study cites that most
amputations are due to the injuries sustained, not tourniquet use. A multicenter study demonstrated 88% effectiveness
in prehospital tourniquet application with significantly lower mortality and amputation
rates than in American military experience. Kragh et al’s military cohort had a 35%
amputation rate, with several civilian series having a frequency of 17% to 29%. We theorize that injury severity was critical
in the decision to amputate than the presence of a tourniquet. A significant number of the initial amputations
had mangled, nearly amputated arms or legs from high-speed motorcycle or all-terrain
vehicle crash. Despite the higher rate of initial amputation,
there was no increase in morbidity, mortality, or length of stay in tourniquet plus patients. Link in the description box below. https://tsaco.bmj.com/content/4/1/e000267 17
Don’t stand underneath doorways in case of earthquakes. Doors and door frames are just not made the
same anymore, so you’re more likely to sustain more serious injuries if you do. You’re better off staying hidden underneath
a desk or table. 18
Drinking alcohol to stay warm. You sweat, your blood will rush to your skin,
and you will freeze and die much faster. Edit. People seem curious about this. Here is a good link.Edit 2. As suggested by another redditor. Edit 3. Actual mythbusters link provided by another
redditor. All links in the description box below. https://www.drinkaware.co.uk/advice/staying-safe-while-drinking/alcohol-and-cold-weather/
https://youtu.be/i8usz04jKcY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjzgsLqaWNU 19
I can think of multiple. Basic wilderness survival is required to be
taught where I live! Don’t drink your pee if you’re thirsty. It’s high in salt and will make you MORE dehydrated,
just like ocean water. Eating snow when you’re thirsty is also
bad. It lowers your core temperature and you can
become hypothermic. Don’t play dead with all bears. Depends on the bear. Some will definitely bleep your bleep up if
you play dead. Grizzly bears. Stand your ground and back up slowly. If it becomes irritated, get into the fetal
position and cover your neck and play dead. Black bears. Throw rocks and sticks at it, and make a LOT
of noise. From my experience, black bears are skittish
and run away. Polar bears. Back away slowly to safety. If they attack, pray they kill you fast. Defend yourself by any means necessary. Remember to always carry bear spray or a gun
if you’re in bear country. When I was in the Navy, we were taught that
small quantities of sea water over long periods of time are better than simply drinking nothing. It won’t sustain you, but it’ll give you another
day or two is what we were taught. Also, will debilitate you but if you’re
just floating in a raft, you’re just laying around anyway. If it’s black, fight back. If it’s brown, lie down. If it’s white, say goodnight. 20
Apparently, some people think the best way to survive a wolf attack is to bend down and
show the wolf you’re submissive towards him and pose as no threat. If you do this, you’re dead. The wolf will 100% kill you. Your best bet is to walk away WITHOUT TURNING
YOUR BACKS ON THEM, maintaining eye contact the whole way. If you look away or turn your back, the wolf’s
killer instinct will kick in and it’ll kill you. Don’t make a lot of noise and aggressive movements
towards a wolf the same way you’d do to a black bear because, most likely, it’ll be
seen as a challenge, not a threat. Wait, but wouldn’t staring it in the eyes
ALSO be seen as a threat? Yes. So don’t turn away. Don’t look it in the eye. You can view anything in your periphery, can’t
you? Eyes down, back away, listen for sounds behind
you. The wolf you see isn’t the one you need to
worry about. This is mostly inconsequential either way. Wolves almost never kill adult humans. For example: “There have been only two verified
fatal healthy wild wolf attacks on humans in North America. Below are a list of verified, questionable
and unverified attacks.” Link in the description box below. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_wolf_attacks_in_North_America 21
“Cotton wicks moisture.” Cotton is probably the worst material to wear
in an outdoor survival situation because it holds moisture and, in doing so, loses its
ability to keep you warm. Here in Colorado, you can always tell who
the Texans are on the ski slopes. They’re wearing jeans. For any non-skiers reading this, jeans are
about the worst imaginable clothing choice for skiing. Snow is just water. There’s a reason you don’t see denim swim
trunks. Cotton kills was the motto for any camping
we did in Scouts if there was water involved. Going out to canoe, doing a hike with possibility
of rain? Hell, just camping near water. Cotton kills, cos it will soak up that water
and weigh you down. 22
It won’t kill you, but don’t pee on a jellyfish sting. It will actually release more of the toxin. Ironically, the best thing to wash a jellyfish
sting with is saltwater. It makes a lot of sense if saltwater triggered
the nematocysts to fire like urine does. They’d all fire into seawater all the time
and disarm the jellyfish. Yes! I used to treat a ton of jellyfish stings
as a beach lifeguard. Saltwater will wash any remaining sting cells
left on your skin without activating more of them. Urine, vinegar, hot water, all of these will
stimulate any of the sting cells that haven’t already stung you. Meat tenderizer is also good for treating
the stings. But my go-to is seawater. 23
Trying to outrun a tornado is about the worst possible thing you can do in a tornado situation. Take shelter. Get underground, go into an interior room,
lay in a ditch while covering your head if you have to. Tornadoes are basically like three year olds
throwing temper tantrums, except instead of toys, its cars, buses, and trains they’re
throwing around. But also toys too, which they can throw hard
enough to literally pass through your body. A vehicle of any kind is about the last place
you want to be when a tornado comes through. Edit. And sure enough, I’ve got people telling me
that, nuh uh, you totally can outrun a tornado because storm chasers do it all the time and
tornadoes only move like 30 miles per hour, which is objectively false. Their top speed is more like 70 miles per
hour. But don’t listen to a random Redditor like
me, here’s what the CDC has to say about it. “If you are in a car, do not try to outrun
a tornado but instead find the nearest sturdy building.” And the NOAA has this to say: “Vehicles are
extremely risky in a tornado. There is no safe option when caught in a tornado
in a car, just slightly less-dangerous ones. If the tornado is visible, far away, and the
traffic is light, you may be able to drive out of its path by moving at right angles
to the tornado. Seek shelter in a sturdy building, or underground
if possible.” I hope discerning Redditors will work out
that what they’re advising there is not to try to outrun a tornado but that you don’t
need to get out of your vehicle if you are very far away from one. And the National Weather Service: “Being in
a vehicle during a tornado is not safe. The best course of action is to drive to the
closest shelter. If you are unable to make it to a safe shelter,
either get down in your car and cover your head, or abandon your car and seek shelter
in a low lying area, such as a ditch or ravine.” So, in short. Never try to outrun a tornado and anyone who
ever tells you otherwise is objectively wrong and spreading dangerous misinformation. End of discussion. All links in the description box below. 24
Punch a shark in the nose. Punching them in the nose is the last resort. It would be more effective to punch them in
the eyes or the gills and use what you can to keep distance. How do you punch underwater? I think gouging would be the only way. Source. Extensive underwater martial arts moves at
age 8. I wrote ‘punch’ as a generalisation for any
sort of jabbing at those areas. I do agree with you that gouging would be
more effective than specifically punching. 25
Sticking your finger up a dog’s bum. I’ve read this a few times. Not a good idea. Best way to deal with a dog attack is to. Try to move away slowly sideways, with your
arms at your sides so that you’re not threatening. Don’t look at the eyes and don’t smile,
both are seen as a challenge. Don’t run away. The dog will instinctively chase you. Get up high if you can. Dogs can’t climb very well. If bleep hits the fan, do the opposite of
looking unthreatening. Stand tall with your arms in the air and growl
or roar. If there’s something nearby, throw it at
the dog to make it think twice. Wrap clothing around your arm to hand to the
dog, should it go in for a bite. You’re pretty much guaranteed to be bit,
so make it in a place that is less important and less likely to bleed out. Don’t lose your footing or fall to the ground. You’ll be toast. Don’t pull away from the dog if it has bitten
you. This will cause more damage. Once the dog has bitten you, it probably won’t
let go. Aim to kill or maim the dog. Fingers in the eyes are good. Jumping on the dog with all your body weight
is better. If you break their ribs, they will probably
give up. Staying away from aggressive dogs is your
best bet. 26
I watch a lot of fight videos on subs like street fights and fight porn, and 1 of 2 things
pretty much always happens when someone gets knocked out. Either their friends come and try to pick
them up, shake them, and slap them on the face to regain consciousness, or they are
left there on their back while people film and laugh and say, “You got knocked the bleep
out!” These are both bad things to do because that
person has just suffered possible serious trauma to their head, especially if they smacked
it on the pavement when they came down, so shaking them awake is not a great thing to
do. It might seem like leaving them be and recover
on their own is a better idea, but it’s not always because they run the risk of choking
on their tongue. The best thing to do is put them in the recovery
position, which will make sure they don’t have problems breathing until they regain
their bearings and if they don’t after a while, it’s a safe way for them to be until medical
help comes. 27
Don’t put severed parts on ice. It’ll practically give the dead tissue frostbite,
thus making it near impossible to reattach. Put it in a dry plastic bag then put that
on ice. This is the correct answer. Keep it dry, but put some paper towels or
something in the bag to insulate it from the ice. You’re trying to keep it cold but not too
cold. Directly against the ice can cause irreversible
damage, even through the plastic bag. You don’t want it dry. You want it slightly moist, so use moist sterile
dressings if possible. Dry is better than submerged though. Semi-related. If you ever lose a whole tooth, put it in
your mouth (under your tongue or in your cheek if you’re not comfortable reinserting it,
or you can reinsert it in the socket if you’re comfortable) and get straight to the dentist. If you do this and get there quick enough,
it’s possible the tooth can be re-rooted. NEVER touch the tooth at the root though,
always the crown. The part that you can see in your mouth. If it’s someone else’s tooth and they
aren’t able to keep it in their mouth, you can put it in a glass of milk while you rush
to the dentist. If it’s someone else’s tooth and they
can’t put it in their mouth and there’s no milk, you can use your own saliva and wrap
it up. If you need to rinse the tooth before putting
it back in your mouth, if it landed on the ground or such, always rinse with milk and
not water. Using water or drying the tooth out will cause
the tooth to start dying. 28
Most of the bleep bear grills does. I think Bear gets a bad rep. In survival, you have to decide what is likely
to kill you first and deal with that first. Often the first and hardest decision you have
to make is the decision to stay put or self rescue. Bear always chooses to self rescue, which
may not always be the best choice, but that’s what the show is. For staying put, Les Stroud is your man. 29
Not quite as sexy and interesting as the rest of these, but if you’re walking alone at
night, putting a key between each finger, with the thought that you can punch someone
and they’ll be impaled by three keys, is useless. You’re much more likely to hurt the webbing
on your fingers since the grip you have on each key will be really weak. Instead, put a single key between your thumb
and forefinger, parallel to your thumb, and make a fist. This still isn’t a great defense, but it
is an improvement over simply a fist. Also, don’t try to kick a man in the crotch
unless you have an amazing shot. In which case, you’re probably better off
running anyway. If you miss or don’t kick hard enough, both
of which are more likely in a case when you’re likely panicking, you’re just going to cause
mild discomfort and bleep him off even more. There was a girl I knew in college who got
assaulted. She took the whole handful of keys with the
keys coming out of the bottom of her fist and just went to town on the guy’s face. It worked and the guy was arrested because
the facial injuries made him easy to recognize. Probably not the best tactic, but hard object
plus adrenaline got the job done. My mom had a 6ish inch baton attached to her
keyring. So, if she needed a weapon, she’d hold onto
the baton and just wail on the guy with the keys. Edit. I should also add that my mom had a ridiculous
amount of keys. So, she was basically just carrying around
a small mace. 30
Curing an eye infection with your urine is dangerous. Let me repeat that. DO NOT under any circumstances put your urine
in your eyes. Head to the doctor. Even waiting it out is better. There’s a trend going on now with people using
‘urine therapy’, putting it in their eyes to detox and ‘cure’ whatever the hell they
think it will, like essential oils. It’s like those books on Amazon claiming making
your autistic child drink chlorine will cure them of autism. WTF is wrong with people. I work in a pharmacy and one day, a lady came
in telling us that she was gonna do this for her kid’s eye infection. Another customer that overheard actually called
child services on her. LOL. Thank you for watching this video. Check the description box for a link to the
original Reddit thread and more info on our channel. Is there a survival myth you’d like to bust? Tell us in the comments below. If you enjoyed this video, be sure to subscribe
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